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People

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  • April 24th
    Clyde Jerome Moss, Vancouver's best-known weatherman, enjoyed a long career in several fields here.
  • April 24th
    As Mother Joseph lay dying in January 1902, she is said to have whispered to the nuns clustered about her, "Sisters, what ever concerns the poor is our affair."
  • April 24th
    The longest term of service by any public utility district commissioner in state history came to an end in August 1961, when Heye Meyer suffered a fatal heart attack while on a salmon fishing trip to Ilwaco.
  • April 24th
    John McLoughlin was born in the province of Quebec in 1784 of an Irish Catholic father and a Scotch Presbyterian mother.
  • April 24th
    One of Clark County's most popular sheriffs once boasted he had never been forced to fire a shot in anger.
  • April 24th
    Although hit by a crippling attack of polio in childhood, Austin McCoy came back to build a career as a Vancouver business and civic leader.
  • April 14th
    Vancouver Barracks was the home of the Seventh Infantry Regiment, and war seemed a long way off when Gen. George C. Marshall arrived in 1936 as commanding officer of the fifth Brigade.
  • April 14th
    When general stores were in vogue, MacMaster was a leading name in the paper mill town of Camas.
  • April 14th
    Growing flowers came naturally to the Luepke family. The grandfather of Vancouver Mayor Rudy Luepke was a florist in Berlin, and members of the family still operate an 80-year-old florist shop here.
  • April 14th
    After arriving in the United States, Kong Loy carried water to other immigrants constructing a railroad.
  • April 14th
    Few families have had more impact on Clark County than Louis and Eliza Lieser and their descendants.
  • April 14th
    Anna Leverich's major contribution to her city was donation of a park that still carries her name.
  • April 14th
    Frederick W. Leadbetter was a leading Clark County figure in the wood and paper industry who founded what is now the Boise Cascade Corp. plant on west Sixth Street.
  • April 14th
    Jesse Morrison Langsdorf established his reputation as a banker, but his descendants are known mostly for their legal endeavors.
  • April 14th
    Most of Carl Landerholm's career was in education, but he is best known for his historical work.
  • April 14th
    Harry Bryan Klineline cannot be considered a Clark County pioneer, but his legacy will remain long after the names of many real pioneers have been forgotten.
  • April 14th
    Hulda Klager, a Woodland resident who died in 1960 at age 96, is remembered widely for her propagation of lilacs.
  • April 14th
    John Kiggins built and owned theaters in the golden days of the downtown cinemas. He was active during the transition from silent films to "talkies," and his name still is in use on the last of the downtown theaters.
  • April 14th
    Edgar F. Kaiser, son of famed industrialist Henry J. Kaiser and a business giant in his own right, was a household name in Vancouver during World War II.
  • April 14th
    Born in Bowling Green, Kentucky on November 21, 1850. Nathaniel Bloomfield was educated at Washington University, in St. Louis.
  • April 14th
    It's a long leap from a creamery in The Netherlands to the huge chain of Burgerville fast-food restaurants in Washington and Oregon, but it all began with a Dutchman named Propstra.
  • April 14th
    In the days when John Jaggy's store was in business, most Vancouver residents were within easy walking distance of all the shops.
  • April 14th
    George Hutton barely shifted gears as he went from a regular work career to a leader in senior citizen activities not long after World War II.
  • April 14th
    They say his eyes were as blue as Irish skies and his heart as big as all Killarney.
  • April 14th
    On the subject of Vancouver, Larry Hobbs' enthusiasm was "both obvious and noisy," one interviewer observed.